June 11 event at Books Actually, Tiong Bahru, Singapore

Books Actually

Dear friends,

I will be appearing at a Books Actually event on June 11th, where I will speak about both my books, Floating on a Malayan Breeze (see here) and Hard Choices: Challenging the Singapore Consensus (see here). Session will be moderated by Jen Wei Ting, good friend and fellow UC Berkeley alumna.

Books Actually is one of Singapore’s only independent bookstores. As you know they all are, unfortunately, buffeted by rising rents, shifts in consumer tastes (video games, aaargh!) and industry upheaval. So, do come out and support them, even if not on this day, then any other. (Fine. I like my games too.)

For those on Facebook, do visit the Event page (click here).

Otherwise, here are the details

11 June 2014, Wednesday
7.30 pm at BooksActually
(№ 9 Yong Siak Street, Singapore 168645)

Synopsis
Floating on a Malayan Breeze uncovered fresh insights about Singapore and Malaysia’s contrasting development, while Hard Choices brought together a selection of critical essays rethinking various aspects of Singapore’s fundamental policies, putting forward a more liberal vision of the city state.

Hear the author, Sudhir Vadaketh discuss the social and political changes occurring in Singapore today, from democratisation to immigration. He will also share thoughts on the writing craft; and the challenges and opportunities as a writer in Singapore.

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Will Singaporeans live in economic ghettoes?

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This article was first published by Yahoo! See here.

Will Singaporeans be happy living in a country comprised of economic ghettoes? That was my enduring thought as I reviewed the animated rebuttals, common and official, to last week’s revelation by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU, my former employer) that Singapore is the world’s most expensive city.

These sorts of surveys should be taken with a pinch of salt. Many subjective decisions influence the methodology. So it shouldn’t really matter that much who is Number 1, 2 or 5. Rather, they should be seen simply as indicative of a larger issue.

However, as we nationalistic Singaporeans tend to do, rather than asking “How can we raise wages (and hence spending power)?” or “How can we make Singapore more affordable?”, many rose in a spirited defence of our apparent affordability, seeking to poke holes in a survey that approximates and compares middle- to upper-income price baskets across major cities.

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